SCARY and True Shark Attacks!

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#5 Sharm el-Sheikh (shake)
This popular resort at the Egyptian Red Sea was not known for shark activity. But it made news in 2010 when a sudden rash of six shark attacks occurred, with one of them fatal. A woman who was suffering from bites to her hand and leg later underwent a partial amputation of those limbs. Accordingly, the beach was closed. Dozens of sharks, including makos (MAY-koes) and oceanic whitetips were captured and killed. It’s still not completely clear what triggered the predators’ behavior. Some experts think it had to do with cattle ships dumping carcasses overboard, and that’s what brought the sharks closer to shore.

#4 Shark on Shark
A previous segment mentioned how a super predator shark may have killed a 9-foot (2.7 m) female great white. Here’s some more proof that sharks will aggressively go after each other. In October 2019 fishermen captured a heavily scarred great white off the coast of Nova Scotia. The animal was among several that were tagged for satellite tracking. Nicknamed “Vimy” (vih-mee) the male specimen measured about 13 feet (4 m) and weighed nearly 1,200 pounds (528 kg). He had evidently encountered an aggressor that had nearly bitten off his head. Vimy was a big beast, so what type of animal could have inflicted such heavy damage? Chances are, he encountered a larger male shark while competing for a female. Or a female shark could have bitten Vimy while they were courting. Experts say that violent behavior during the mating process is typical for sharks, and bites on the noggin are par for the course. Larger sharks were located around the same time in that area of the North Atlantic, including a great white that measured some 17 feet (5.2 m)!

#3 USS Indianapolis
In 1945 the battleship USS Indianapolis delivered the primary components for the first operational atomic bomb to a naval base on a small island in the Pacific. It was later dispatched to meet another battleship in the Philippines to help coordinate an invasion of Japan. But en route to her destination, the Indianapolis was hit by Japanese torpedoes. The impact ignited a chain reaction of explosions that blasted the battleship in two. Within 12 minutes the vessel sank with nearly 1,200 crewmen aboard. It would take at least 4 days for a rescue ship to arrive. By then, the explosions had attracted countless sharks to the scene, where they fed for days. The animals initially went after corpses floating in the water. But the struggles of the living drew the sharks to them as well. By the time rescue efforts arrived, only 317 men had survived. Experts say that about 150 deaths were directly caused by what were probably oceanic whitetip sharks. While there isn’t an exact number, many sources cite this as the worst maritime disaster in the history of the US Navy.

#2 Jersey Shore Shark Attacks
These days, “Jersey Shore” is probably better known as the title of the MTV reality show. But back in 1916, the New Jersey coast was the location of a series of deadly shark attacks. Five people were attacked between July 1st and July 12th, with only one survivor. An unprecedented wave of panic swept along the coast of New Jersey and spread to New York. Shark hunting parties were formed, and resort towns erected steel nets to enclose their public beaches and protect swimmers. Shark sightings increased along the Mid-Atlantic coasts, and hundreds of them were caught in what is now regarded as one of history’s largest scale animal hunts. On July 14 a juvenile great white was captured in Raritan Bay. Measuring 7.5 feet (2.3 m) and weighing 325 pounds (147 kg), human remains found within it seemed to confirm that it was the so-called “Jersey Man-Eater.” Following its capture, no further shark attacks were reported. But why the shark went rogue remains a mystery. If it all sounds like the story of “Jaws,” it’s because the famous book and movie were partly inspired by these events.

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VDO SCARY and True Shark Attacks!

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